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PGCPS Employee Wellness

PGCPS is thrilled to announce a NEW online fitness and wellness service available! 
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Simply go to click here to learn more and get your FREE login details. 


Our partnership with BurnAlong gives you:
  • Instant access to on-demand and live video classes from 100’s of instructors spanning 45+ health and wellness categories (from cardio to yoga to dance to mindfulness to sleep to nutrition to financial wellbeing to prenatal to kids classes to classes for chronic conditions). 
  • Accessible on phones, tablets, computers, and smart TVs.
  • The youngest person who uses BurnAlong is 6 weeks old (taking mother and me classes) and the oldest is 97 (and counting). There are classes for every age, interest, and level. 
  • Classes range from 5 minutes to more than 60 minutes.
  • You can take classes alone or (very popular!) you can also invite friends and family to join you live – see and hear each other while taking classes together. 

The service is available free of charge to permanent PGCPS Employees and their family members (you can add up to four family members under your account). 

 
For questions, please reach out to wellness.benefits@pgcps.org or CustomerCare@BurnAlong.com.
 
Simply Scan Below to sign up!
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From the desk of Mr. Sellman….

Friends,

Below I’ve posted a link to the many services offered to the residents of Prince George’s County. Please take a minute to look over these services to see if any will interest you. Feel free to have your spouse, your friends, your children, your significant other, your parent, your grandparent or anyone else in your circle to look at these services as well. Let’s utilize the services that the county has instituted for us. Our tax dollars fund these programs in one way or the other so lets take advantage of what is essentially ours.

As always, I mimic what I have said over the past months as it pertains to one of the most significant trial that we are facing, Covid-19.

Please wear your masks

Please practice social distancing

and

Please wash your hands.

Although hand sanitizer is a great on-the-go alternative, washing your hands with good old fashioned soap and hot water is much, much better.

Please….Stay Safe.

With Respect,

William H. Sellman

 

https://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/148/Services

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Protect yourself and others from COVID-19

This information was obtained from the website of the World Health Organization

 If COVID-19 is spreading in your community, stay safe by taking some simple precautions, such as physical distancing, wearing a mask, keeping rooms well ventilated, avoiding crowds, cleaning your hands, and coughing into a bent elbow or tissue. Check local advice where you live and work. Do it all!

What to do to keep yourself and others safe from COVID-19

  • Maintain at least a 1-metre distance between yourself and others to reduce your risk of infection when they cough, sneeze or speak. Maintain an even greater distance between yourself and others when indoors. The further away, the better.
  • Make wearing a mask a normal part of being around other people.

Here are the basics of how to wear a mask:

  • Clean your hands before you put your mask on, as well as before and after you take it off.
  • Make sure it covers both your nose, mouth and chin.

Here are some specifics on what type of mask to wear and when, depending on how much virus is circulating where you live, where you go and who you are.

  • Wear a fabric mask unless you’re in a particular risk group. This is especially important when you can’t stay physically distanced, particularly in crowded and poorly ventilated indoor settings.
  • Wear a medical/surgical mask if you:
    • Are over 60,
    • Have underlying medical conditions,
    • Are feeling unwell, and/or
    • Are looking after an ill family member.
  • For more public advice on masks, read our Q&Aand watch our  videos. There is also a Q&A focused on masks and children.
  • For health workers, medical masks are essential personal protective equipment when engaging with patients with suspected, probable or confirmed COVID-19. Respirator masks (such as FFP2, FFP3, N95, N99) should be used in settings where procedures generating aerosols are performed and must be fitted to ensure the right size is worn.
  • Find out more about the science of how COVID-19 infects people and our bodies react by watching or reading this interview.

 

How to make your environment safer

  • Avoid the 3Cs: spaces that are closed, crowded or involve close contact.
    • Outbreaks have been reported in restaurants, choir practices, fitness classes, nightclubs, offices and places of worship where people have gathered, often in crowded indoor settings where they talk loudly, shout, breathe heavily or sing.
    • The risks of getting COVID-19 are higher in crowded and inadequately ventilated spaces where infected people spend long periods of time together in close proximity. These environments are where the virus appears to spreads by respiratory droplets or aerosols more efficiently, so taking precautions is even more important.
  • Meet people outside. Outdoor gatherings are safer than indoor ones, particularly if indoor spaces are small and without outdoor air coming in.
    • For more information on how to hold events like family gatherings, children’s football games and family occasions, read our Q&A on small public gatherings.
  • Avoid crowded or indoor settings but if you can’t, then take precautions:

 

Don’t forget the basics of good hygiene

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. This eliminates germs including viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately into a closed bin and wash your hands. By following good ‘respiratory hygiene’, you protect the people around you from viruses, which cause colds, flu and COVID-19.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces frequently especially those which are regularly touched, such as door handles, faucets and phone screens.

 

What to do if you feel unwell

  • Know the full range of symptoms of COVID-19. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, dry cough, and tiredness. Other symptoms that are less common and may affect some patients include loss of taste or smell, aches and pains, headache, sore throat, nasal congestion, red eyes, diarrhoea, or a skin rash.
  • Stay home and self-isolate even if you have minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Call your health care provider or hotline for advice. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house or have someone near you, wear a medical mask to avoid infecting others.
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately. Call by telephone first, if you can and follow the directions of your local health authority.
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities. Local and national authorities and public health units are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

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Employee Assistance Program

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CDC Self Protection Recommendations

Protect Yourself

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing serious complications from COVID-19 illness. More information on Are you at higher risk for serious illness.

Know how it spreads

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
    • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
    • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

Everyone Should

Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash:
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • Before touching your face
    • After using the restroom
    • After leaving a public place
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After handling your cloth face covering
    • After changing a diaper
    • After caring for someone sick
    • After touching animals or pets
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean and disinfect

Monitor Your Health Daily

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature if symptoms develop.
    • Don’t take your temperature within 30 minutes of exercising or after taking medications that could lower your temperature, like acetaminophen.
  • Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.
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PG County Social Services

The Department of Social Services’ Emergency Food Assistance Program acts as a clearinghouse for the distribution of donated food. Over 30 local community pantries and shelters currently participate in the program. All food is provided to eligible individuals and families free of charge. Please call 301-909-6343 to get information and assistance within your particular area of the County.

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#WeRise

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The promise of America—that if you work hard you and your family can get ahead—is a broken promise for too many Americans.

There are too many poverty-wage jobs with no benefits and irregular hours, and not enough good, union jobs where you and your co-workers can negotiate higher pay and better healthcare coverage. We need more union jobs that provide financial security for families and build thriving communities.

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court is considering a case, Janus v. AFSCME, that would make things even worse, dividing working people and making it more difficult to join together in unions.

Watch and Share Now!

The good news is that the resistance to this attack on working people is alive and well. Click here to watch and share the video of workers rising up and fighting back at more than 600 actions across the nation.

Share the video and get involved in the fight for more good, union jobs.

In unity,

Mary Kay Henry

International President

SEIU

 

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